Tag: Christopher Nolan

May 7, 2014 / / Main Slate

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Before he even stepped in front of a camera, David Bowie carried the mantle of a matinee idol.  His cubist bone structure, the well-coiffed locks and wide-legged trousers of his early years recalled Katharine Hepburn.  The camera loved his feline grace and sulky hauteur.  One of his earliest onscreen appearances, ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS, could double as a screen test, both for its shoddy film quality and for the versatility of his talents and personae. 

August 27, 2012 / / Main Slate

Inception – 2010 – dir. Christopher Nolan

It’s one of the cliches of film criticism for a critic unimpressed with a big action movie to compare it to a video game. It’s understandable, seeing as the movies at the receiving end of these complaints generally would be a lot more fun to play than to watch. It’s also unfair to the medium of video games, which has seen a fast-paced evolution in artistic creativity and experimentation. In the summer of 2010, two films were released that could be compared to video games without it being an insult. One was Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, a still underrated soon-to-be cult classic mash-up of video game-inspired style with manga, rock musical, and indie romcom influences. The other film didn’t show its influences as overtly; to those not familiar with games, their influence could completely be ignored while enjoying this particular film. But it occurs to me that the reason Inception was able to captivate so many audiences was because, in essence, the film was a game.

January 18, 2011 / / Main Slate

Inception – 2010 – dir. Christopher Nolan

I was very impressed with the world of Nolan’s film.  It seemed as though so much was possible, even though we only see a small piece of it.  The audience is along for the ride from the very first shot.  A world where you can explore other people’s dreams?  We buy it seamlessly.  Heck, it’s fun to imagine, similar to how a world without murder is fun to imagine in Spielberg’s Minority Report.